Common Ingredients Conversion Chart

In the U.S., volumes (cups, tablespoons, and teaspoons) are the primary measurements used in recipes. In contrast, majority of countries leans towards weighing ingredients in grams and milliliters. This difference isn’t just a matter of preference; it reflects a divide in approach. Volume measurements can be quicker for casual cooking, but they introduce a margin of error not found in the precision of weight measurements.

The importance of weighing ingredients becomes paramount in baking, a culinary discipline often likened to chemistry. In baking, the exact ratios of ingredients matter significantly. A little too much flour or a tad too little butter can dramatically affect the texture, rise, and even flavor of baked goods. This is why many professional bakers and chefs around the world advocate for using a kitchen scale. It ensures accuracy, consistency, and, ultimately, the success of any recipe.

It’s always recommended to use a kitchen scale for precise measurements and understanding how to convert measurements ensures that you’re speaking the universal language of food with precision and care.

ALL PURPOSE FLOUR
CUPOZGRAMS
1/4 1 .2540
1/3 1.5050
1/2 2.5075
2/3 3.33100
3/4 3.75110
1 5 150
BUTTER
CUPTBSP/TSPOZGRAMS
1/35+12.6776
1/2 (1 stick)84115
2/310+25.33150
1168227
COCOA
CUPOZGRAMS
1/4130
1/31.540
1/22.2 60
3/4390
14.4125
LIQUIDS
CUPFL OZML
1/4 2 60
1/3 2.575
1/2 4 120
2/3 5 150
3/4 6 180
1 8 240
GRANULATED SUGAR
CUPOZGRAMS
1/4260
1/32 ½75
1/24120
2/35150
3/46180
18240
BROWN SUGAR
CUPOZGRAMS
1/4 1 ½45
1/3 1 ⅓40
1/2 260
2/3 2 ⅔80
3/4 390
1 4120
POWDERED SUGAR
CUPOZGRAMS
1/4 130
1/3 260
1/2 390
2/3 4 120
3/4 4 ½135
1 6180
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